Posts tagged guest artists
'Everybody goes about it in a different way': An interview with guest artist Nick Harmsen

KP percussionist Angus Wilson caught up with clarinettist Nick Harmsen, who will be performing with the ensemble in Brett Dean's sextet Old Kings in Exile this Friday at the Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts. Here's what he had to say. Angus Wilson: Hi Nick, welcome to your debut performance with Kupka’s Piano! We are thrilled to have you on board for ‘Modern Music in Exile’. What excites you the most about performing in this concert with Kupka’s Piano?

Nick Harmsen: I've been a fan of Brett Dean’s music ever since I first played some of his works for larger orchestral combinations like Beggars and Angels.  Playing new, recently written music by excellent composers is always a thrill but Brett’s Australian connection makes his music even more appealing - he’s a friendly face who’s popped up over the years at concerts where I've been playing his music and he’s always so encouraging and embodies everything that’s good about classical music. One of the great things about playing music is working with different musicians - everybody goes about it in a different way - and watching what certain personalities can create together is always fascinating and sometimes really uplifting.  Other times it doesn't work so well and you learn a lot from that.  And I’ve heard around town that you are bunch of guys who are really passionate about bringing life to new music which is a vital part of keeping music making alive.

AW: The centerpiece of this concert is Dean's Old Kings in Exile. As a musician who’s played several of his works before (including one earlier this year), what interests you about his work and what has been your experience performing it?

NH: Earlier this year I played a trio by Brett Dean for piano, viola and clarinet called Night Window.  As the title suggests it’s all about dreams and nightmares.  It’s extremely difficult to get together.  It is often rhythmically very intricate.  However it also has sections which are slow and expressive.  Contrasting with that it has other sections which are jazz influenced and others have virtuosic cadenzas.  In the orchestral pieces I’ve played of his I’ve noticed too that he's not afraid to push the boundaries of possibilities and experiment whilst importantly keeping a really strong sense of a piece as a whole which I think is very important.

AW: On top of being an awesome Bass Clarinettist with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, word is on the street that you also pursue other musical ventures including composing. Can you tell us a little bit about some of your recent compositions?

NH: I don't really consider myself a composer, but occasionally I have dabbled with it.  The last piece I wrote was for two ocarinas, and before that a piece for bass clarinet, vibraphone, irish whistle, gong and kalimba.  I also play occasionally with a bush band on banjo.

AW: You mentioned during a rehearsal a few weeks ago that you were a part of a charity concert raising funds for the continued relief and support of tsunami affected people in Japan. Could you tell us more about this?

NH: It seemed immediately after the tsunami first hit Japan in 2011 it was constantly in the news.  However now we hear about it very little.  The problem has not just gone away - people are still trying to repair the damage, and to get their lives back on the rails.  And the effects of the leakage of nuclear waste from Fukushima may be felt for many many years to come. I wrote a piece which I performed in this recent benefit concert based on a story of a 93 year old woman who lived in Fukushima with her family.  After the nuclear plant was damaged in the tsunami her family decided to flee Fukushima to find a safer area to live.  The woman decided to stay in Fukushima - she was old and frail and couldn’t fathom the idea of leaving the place she had such a deep connection with.  However eventually she committed suicide because she was so devastated about what had happened to her home town and the break it had caused with her family.

AW: Finally what projects have you got coming up? Any performances with your brilliant significant other percussionist Nozomi Omote? Will the Brahms Quintet get another outing? Will we get to hear a concert of all Harmsen works in the near future? Where can our audience hear you next?

NH: Anyone wanting to hear fairly ordinary renditions of some great Chad Morgan, Paul Kelly and Red Gum classics should camp outside my window in the next week or so.  Failing that, Nozomi is working on the follow up concert to her extremely successful Marimba Galaxy!

'Limits are lame': An interview with guest artist Jodie Rottle

Jodie Rottle Whilst Kupka's Piano flautist Hannah Reardon-Smith is momentarily abroad, we're pleased to announce that we're welcoming American artist Jodie Rottle into the ensemble fold for the next concert 'Modern Music in Exile' on Friday May 23rd. Kupka's pianist Alex Raineri chats with Jodie about her musical life thus far and what's ahead in 2014.

Alex Raineri: We're really excited to be working with you for two of our concerts this year in our series at the Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts, 'Modern Music in Exile' (May 23rd) and 'Absent, Almost Absent' (November 28th). We've got some wonderful and challenging repertoire on those two programs, I'm interested to know what excites you about the style of music Kupka's Piano presents?

Jodie Rottle: I'm honored to be working with Kupka's Piano this season. My experience with the ensemble so far as an audience member has been nothing short of inspiring, and I can't wait to share the stage in Brisbane with such a committed group of musicians. I'm particularly excited to perform Brett Dean's mammoth Old Kings in Exile and premier Melody Eötvös's newest work in May. I think the 'Modern Music in Exile' concept is brilliant. To me, it challenges the idea of nationalism in music and addresses the contribution that identity and environment provide to artistic output.

AR: I was really interested to read about your ensemble Dead Language. How do you manage your involvement with the group from afar and what are your thoughts about the composer/performer collaboration? Perhaps could you speak a bit about the role of improvisation in your creative practice?

JR: Dead Language approaches the contemporary classical music realm with a sense of humility. It is a physical embodiment of everything I stand for in new music. We don't care who listens to us; we care that we have something to say and do so through the medium of our instruments. We are open to performing anything: contemporary classical "standards", commissions by our colleagues, graphic or improvisatory works, and self-composed pieces about wolves, white noise, and people who eat noisy sandwiches during quiet moments. I think I have maybe played flute for only half of our performances. I have spent the rest of the time dressing in hazmat suits, playing with stuffed toys, and having a great time.

When I made the decision to move to Australia last year, I was devastated to leave a group that had made such a huge impact on my artistic life. I didn't need to worry, though, because we have learned to accept the distance, and it has further strengthened who we are as an ensemble. The fact that we make music together only once or twice a year has allowed us to realize the importance of quality over quantity. I haven't rehearsed or performed with Dead Language since December, but I oddly still feel as though I am on a 'high' of inspiration from our latest performance. We aren't New York based anymore, we are world-based.

I have always cherished the opportunity to work directly with composers as I believe it is vital for informed performance of new works. Being a part of Dead Language has not only confirmed this belief, but it also has put the composer/performer collaboration in a new light. We grant ourselves full artistic freedom. Anything goes, as long as it is informed and done with conviction. I am not just an instrumentalist in Dead Language, I am an interpreter, a composer, and an improviser. I have really enjoyed taking this attitude out of Dead Language context and applying it to all my playing.

AR: You've spent some time as artist in residence at the Banff Centre and the Bang on A Can Summer Institute and you also have a masters of contemporary performance from the Manhattan School of Music. How would you say living in the States and being exposed to so many new works by American composers has moulded your musical tastes and influences?

JR: Location has definitely played a role in defining my musical tastes, but I don't think that I have ever thought to throw an "American" label on the weight of my experiences. I met my former teacher, flutist Tara Helen O'Connor, while at Banff and her inclusive approach to performing any music from any genre with vibrance and energy radically changed my views about being an artist. She taught me that no limits exist unless I define a boundary, and why set any limits in the first place? Limits are lame.

This attitude helped me digest the quantity of schools of musical thought that you are inevitably smacked over the head with when living in New York. It's almost like choosing sides: are you Uptown, or Downtown? Free improv or art music? Classical or contemporary? I'm not about to completely exclude something just because of a judgement or label. I have enjoyed exploring the musical gamut with an open mind and without any limitations, and I think this has shaped who I am as a person just as much as it has shaped my musical tastes.

AR: Now that you're based in Australia, how would you make a comparison between the new music scene in the USA and Brisbane? For me, the arts in Australia are imbued with a wonderful openness to act as a springboard for interesting thoughts and projects to become realised but I imagine it must seem rather contained having come from the hustle and bustle of the American musical culture?

JR: My life in Australia is still young, so perhaps I do not have enough authority to make a statement on the matter. Given my experiences to date, I completely agree that the arts in Australia are approached with an open and appreciating mind. I'm not sure if the new music scene in the entirety of the USA can fairly be pitted against that of Brisbane. Scope is an enormous factor. The new music scenes are even drastically different on the west coast of America than on the east, which creates a bit of an overwhelming barrier.

I will say that regardless of location, musicians operate within some sort of circle connecting them to resources, people, and an environment that drives personal creativity. Even though the population is much larger in the States and the musical history is quite vast, I believe that Australia and America are similar in respect to this interconnectivity. It is so important to realize the reach of artistic circles and never be afraid to extend it further.

I wouldn't say the life of contemporary music in Australia is any more contained than it is in America. Currently, I've noticed that Americans feel an obligation to do something different that will give an edge to their artistry, and this is actually quite crippling. It detracts from one's innate artistic sensibilities and instead focuses on the importance of an outsider's reception. Gone are the days of the nineties when everyone received a gold star. There is a rising expectation for artists to be different, cutting edge, or revolutionary solely for the sake of doing so. This pressure is the biggest container of all.

AR: Lastly, what are your top 5 desert island pieces?! What music is making you tick?

JR: Steve Reich's Different Trains, anything by The Books (I guess I'm cheating on that one), Luciano Berio's Sequenza XIV for 'cello, Bjork's entire "Vespertine" album, and Tchaikovsky's Trio in A minor op. 50.

Check out Jodie's website here: www.jodierottle.com

Meet our guest percussionists

In our first concert of the year we're featuring several guests and old friends as performers alongside the Kupka crew. Rebecca Lloyd-Jones and Elizabeth John are two accomplished percussionists with a long history of playing new art music. In our March 8 concert - A new sun rises: Modernist music in Asia - Bec and Liz will be performing Guo Wenjing's Parade alongside our own percussionist Angus Wilson. BecLloydJones

Rebecca has worked extensively with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Sydney Sinfonia, The Australian National Acadmey of Music, The Royal Australian Navy Band, The Australian Youth Orchestra and as a Freelance musician with many groups including Clocked Out Duo, Isorhythmos, Speak Percussion, various chamber music ensembles and regularly performs at various events and festivals throughout Australia. In 2011, Rebecca toured with Mod Dance Company premiering Graeme Murphy’s Suite Synergy nationally. Rebecca completed her Honours Degree in 2012 at the Victorian College of the Arts, graduating with the Desma Woolcock bursary for academic excellence.

Photo by Sharka Bosakova (c) 2013

Elizabeth has recently finished her Bachelor of Music in Percussion at the QLD Griffith Conservatorium, studying under Vanessa Tomlinson. In her collaborations with Kupka's local composers she was invited to perform with them in Sydney as part of Australia's New Music Network Mini Series program in 2011. Last year she ventured into event organising with Brisbane's Cage in Us festival where she worked and performed with Swedish percussion ensemble Kroumata, and worked as sub-curator on a local project to bring art into the community. With an appreciation for contemporary music and performance she received the Pearl/Adams 2012 scholarship to travel to the United States and attend the So Percussion Summer Institute at Princeton University.

Don't miss out on Kupka's first concert of the year! Buy your tickets now! You know that four-concert subscriptions are available, right?